La tunisie Medicale - 2020 ; Vol 98 ( n°05 ) : 363-369
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Summary

Introduction: Simulation is a growing pedagogical method in training health professionals. The use of high-fidelity simulators may be associated with significant stress.
Objective: to measure self-assessed intensity of stress before and after a planned simulation training session of a third degree atrio-ventricular block  among  medical students.
Methods: A sample of 30 students participating in a high-fidelity simulation training course (10 playing the role of team leader and 20 in the role of medical intern) was studied. Stress was evaluated by self-assessment using a numerical scale before and after the session. The peri-traumatic distress inventory was used to measure the level of distress experienced by the participants.
Results: The median stress score was 3, 5±2, 4 before and 6, 2±2, 4 after the simulation session (p<0.001). Stress intensity increased significantly after the session in students playing the role of the team leader than those playing the role of medical intern (8, 4±0, 8 versus 5, 2±2, 3 p<0.001).The average score for peri-traumatic distress inventory was also significantly higher in the team leaders (18, 8±10, 4 Vs 9, 2±3, 7 p=0,022).
Conclusion: Simulation-induced stress, as measured by self-assessment, increased significantly after the session and was influenced by the role to be played during the scenario.  Stress should be taken into account before debriefing.

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